Navigating The New Normal With COVID-19: A Year In Review & Predictions For The Year To Come

Free Webinar, Sponsored by Qualifacts + Credible

This year has been one unlike anything we have ever experienced. This essential webinar will help attendees gain a thorough understanding and deep perspective on the changes, challenges, and strategies that health and human services organizations have experienced and utilized over the last year. Our faculty will take a deep dive look into the various strategies that have been utilized to create stability, resiliency, and success in weathering the ‘new normal’ created by COVID-19.

New Service Lines & New Revenue Streams: Building A Diversification Strategy & Conducting A Feasibility Analysis

Executive Web Briefing, Sponsored by Qualifacts + Credible 

Relying on a single payer or revenue stream is becoming a risky proposition. Now, more than ever, the ability to evaluate and modify current services and to develop new services to meet the challenges and opportunities in the market is an essential skill all executives need to master.

During this important session, led by OPEN MINDS Senior Associate Joe Naughton-Travers, attendees learned a process for evaluating service line performance and repurposing or launching new revenue streams.

Download Presentation (PDF)

CBHA’s Virtual Provider Sustainability Forum

Virtual Provider Sustainability Forum, Sponsored by Qualifacts + Credible

The Executive Webinars will be led by OPEN MINDS Senior Associates, Ken Carr, Joe Naughton-Travers, and Paul Duck, bringing over 30 years of finance, technology, data analysis and reporting experience in the health and human service field.

Forum Sessions:
1. Short Term Cash Management – Assuring Continued Operations
2. Revenue Maximization During Times Of Disruption – Building Top Line To Sustain Margins
3. Strategic Planning For Post-Disruption Recovery & Sustainability

A Game Plan for Building a Sustainable Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic (CCBHC)

The goal of the Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinics (CCBHC) is to improve patient care across the healthcare spectrum, serving highly complex patients while avoiding the use of high-cost, low-return care models though community-based alternatives that improve care management. Based on the success of the first wave of CCHBC’s, Congress has acted five times to extend the demonstration project and has allocated $450 million (to date) for CCBHC expansion grants. The number of CCBHC’s have expanded from 66 in 2015, to 166 in 2020.  The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has embraced the CCBHC concept of integrated care and behavioral health providers, who have long supported integrated care, are now looking to the CCBHC model as an economically viable way to support this model of care.

Indeed, CCBHC’s have an excellent opportunity to be leaders in the new integrated healthcare system if they can display the following specific values:

  1. Accessibility: All needed services – mental health, substance abuse treatment, and physical health care – are provided in-house or quickly, in proximity, within the community.
  2. Efficiency: Multiple services can be provided daily, with one patient visit instead of multiple visits.
  3. Connection: Electronic Health Records (EHR) are used across service lines to produce and track clinical and quality metrics.
  4. Accountability: A commitment to producing the array of quality metrics required for quarterly reporting, in nearly real time.
  5. Adaptability: A commitment to using bundled payment arrangements that help clinics adopt and utilize alternative payment models instead of fee-for-service.

To meet these core values, provider organizations, in many cases, have had to update their organization’s service lines, hire new staff, and implement or update Electronic Health Record systems (EHRs). These changes represent substantial economic and human resource expenses. While enhanced reimbursement and up-front grant dollars have helped to offset the expense, it still begs the question: “How does an organization sustain the model beyond the grant period?” (https://vbcforbh.com/are-you-really-ready-for-value-based-payment/)

Thinking Beyond Grant Funding

The recipients of the 2020 CCBHC Expansion Grant the funding stream are only guaranteed funding for two years. A few considerations are important. The first is that funding may not be renewed. Considering potential fiscal deficits expected from the COVID epidemic, there is a distinct possibility that additional funding will not be there. A second possibility is that state funding may supplant federal funding. As states grapple with the aftermath of a pandemic, fewer state dollars will be available.  Already, Nevada has made a 6% cut to Medicaid dollars (https://vbcforbh.com/nevada-moves-forward-with-6-medicaid-fee-for-service-rate-cut/).

SAMSHA was abundantly clear that grant participants should not expect more federal support. The newest round of grantees were given the task to: “Develop and implement plans for sustainability to ensure delivery of services once federal funding ends. Recipients should not anticipate the continued renewal of federal funding to support this effort. Federal funding is subject to funding availability and is also subject to a competitive grant award process. Recipients must develop and implement sustainability plans to ensure continued service once the grant ends. Recipients will be asked to report on sustainability plans” (https://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/grants/pdf/fy-2020-ccbhc-foa.pdf).

The long-term sustainability of CCBHC programming requires a strategic response.

Community Behavioral Health Clinic (CCBHC) Sustainability and Value-Based Reimbursement

The CCBHC’s with an eye toward a future will be looking for alternative revenue streams immediately. The good news is that the CCBHC infrastructure of data driven health care focused on improved outcomes and diminished costs is an ideal match for payers who are looking for lower cost interventions and improved population health, and are using Value Based Reimbursement (VBR) to meet these goals.

The organizational readiness for CCBHC implementation has laid the groundwork for Value Based Programming.  The development of Evidenced Based Practices, addition of service lines, hiring new staff, affiliations with emergency care, adoption enhanced payment processes, and implementing and updating you Electronic Health Records (EHR) to capture clinical and quality data has positioned CCBHC to think about working with both private and public payers.

A Growing Value Based Culture

The OPEN MINDS 2019 State-By-State Update found that 28 of the 40 states with Medicaid managed care require health plans to implement alternative payment arrangements (APMs) with provider organizations. This is up from 22 states out of 39 states in 2017. And Value-Based processes are at the center of the trend. Organizational readiness for VBR follows a defined path:

(See OPEN MINDS Are You Really Ready for Value-Based Payment?)

The CCBHC is already this path, developing a VBR infrastructure. The next step is to define the unique value proposition of the CCBHC.

Defining the Unique Value Proposition to New Payors

A successful sustainability plan keeps the following goals in mind:

  • Have the Data: Understand internal unit costs and key performance indicators (KPI). Fortunately, the data needed to do this can be found in your CCBHC data. Use this to data to develop a picture of what the CCBHC does well, and where there are opportunities for improvement. Knowing strengths and possible risks will be important guides in rate negotiations.
  • Know the Customer: Research the payers in the market. For the health plans and accountable care organizations, know their structure and customers, their current service delivery network, executive teams, and their enrollment in your service areas. A CCBHC plan has flexibility to meet the changing needs of the marketplace. Alignment with those needs will make a CCBHC more attractive to payers that need services.  (See What Are Health Plans Actually Doing? and Trends in Behavioral Health: A Population Health Manager’s Reference Guide on the U.S. Behavioral Health Financing and Delivery System).
  • Prepare for the End-Game. Think about future meetings with health plan executives to discuss current contracts and proposed services as the CCBHC plan is developed. Be prepared with a proposal and assess readiness for newer payment models (Use the Value-Based Reimbursement Readiness Assessment).

Build Relationships Now

Avoid scrambling at the last moment for new funding streams. Remember, payers know that mental health and substance use disorders are the leading causes of disease burden in America.  This is further exacerbated by co-morbidities faced by people with mental health and substance use disorders who also suffer from cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, and other chronic diseases. The CCBHC is addressing this issue head on and that needs to be highlighted. To do this you can start by doing the following:

  • Build relationships with payers immediately: Reach as high into the payer organization as possible to develop those relationships. Then attempt to establish formal touchpoints. A scorecard with quarterly data will provide updates on key points that may be of value to the health plan. These interactions need to be succinct and to the point.
  • Develop a Pitch Deck: Prepare a brief (one or two slide) value story that describes how the CCBHC’s programs are differentiated in terms of quality and costs, and how they contribute to health care cost savings for the payer.
  • Leverage Informal Meetings: Attend conferences and industry meetings with target payers. These less formal venues allow for additional touchpoints to reiterate the value the CCBHC brings to the table, and the differentiating strengths.

Finally, connecting with health plans comes down to persistence.  Provider organizations need to find the right contact in network management, or whoever is leading their local plan and continue to reach out. In the end, relationship-building is still based on quality communication. The CCBHC model is the perfect framework to build relationships with payer organizations.

COVID-19 and Value-Based Reimbursement: What Do We Know? Where Will it Go?

The impacts of COVID-19 on health care continue to unfold, and one area of uncertainty is the impact COVID will have on Value Based Reimbursements (VBR). Regardless of this uncertainty it appears that VBR is still trending upwards in behavioral health care.  Surveys conducted by OPEN MINDS demonstrate more use of episodic payments, case rates, and bundled rates. In one health plan survey, the number of health plans using bundled payments or case rates rose from 39% to 59% from 2017 to 2019 (see Trends in Behavioral Health: A Population Health Manager’s Reference Guide on the U.S. Behavioral Health Financing and Delivery System and What Are The Health Plans Doing About VBR?). And, a more recent survey of specialty provider organizations found that 24% of those organizations have some bundled rate contracts (see 2020 OPEN MINDS Performance Management Executive Survey: Where Are We On The Road To Value). A similar trend is noted in the public payer market, where a recent state-by-state analysis found that 28 of the 40 states with Medicaid managed care require health plans to implement alternative payment arrangements (APMs) with provider organizations. This is up from 22 states out of 39 states in 2017

With the continued growth of VBR, many questions about how the pandemic will change VBR processes remain. Some current trends shed light on this question. These trends also give providers clues about areas of focus moving forward in this ‘next normal’.

Shift to Telehealth

One of the astonishing developments of the pandemic is the phenomenal growth of telehealth utilization in behavioral health care. Telehealth has become ubiquitous during the pandemic. Some interesting results of a recent survey by Qualifacts and the National Council for Behavioral Health include:

  • Pre-pandemic, telehealth utilization in behavioral health care was relatively low, only 2% of organizations were providing 80% or more of their care virtually
  • Policy changes during the COVID-19 pandemic have reduced barriers to telehealth. Now, 60% of behavioral health organizations are providing 80% or more virtual care.
  • Behavioral health care executives expect the higher utilization of virtual services to continue, with a majority believing 40 % to 60% of their overall services will be provide in virtual platforms.

In the public sector, there have been sweeping changes in regulation and reimbursement for telehealth services. While the permanence of the changes in the public payer space has not been determined, it’s evident a system-wide reevaluation is occurring.  Some states have enacted new legislation already. For instance, On July 6, 2020, the Colorado legislature passed Senate Bill 212 to expand access to Medicaid telehealth services. The bill expands Medicaid coverage for telehealth services to include reimbursement at parity with in-person services at rural health clinics, federally qualified health centers (FQHC’s), and the Indian Health Service facilities.

Furthermore, the shift to telehealth is also be reinforced by the recent recognition by the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) revision of HEDIS Quality Measures associated with Telehealth utilization during the pandemic. https://bhmpc.com/2016/10/hedis-success-value-based-care/

New NCQA HEDIS Telehealth Rules

NCQA  adjusted 40 Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) measures—in response to the surge in telehealth during the pandemic (see NCQA HEDIS Quality Measures Adjusted For Increased Telehealth Use In Pandemic Crisis). The adjustments, published July 1, will go into effect in 2020 and include eight measures related to behavioral health—medication adherence, follow-up care after hospitalization or emergency department visits, and monitoring of co-occurring medical conditions in consumers with serious mental illness. For each measure, the updated guidance specifies how telehealth visits can be used and what will be included and excluded in the measure’s denominator and numerator. Most importantly, NCQA removed restrictions on video visits and now recognizes a video visit as the same as an in-person visit. Eight of the adjustments affect behavioral health measures (NCQA.org/COVID):

  1. Antidepressant Medication Management
  2. Follow-up Care for Children Prescribed ADHD Medication
  3. Follow-up After Hospitalization for Mental Illness
  4. Follow-up After Emergency Department Visit for Mental Illness
  5. Diabetes Screening for People with Schizophrenia or Bipolar Disorder Who Are Using Antipsychotic Medication
  6. Cardiovascular Monitoring for People with Cardiovascular Disease and Schizophrenia
  7. Diabetes Monitoring for People with Diabetes and Schizophrenia
  8. Adherence to Antipsychotic Medications for Individuals with Schizophrenia

The implication of the of the updated HEDIS measures is that telehealth coverage will carry forward to the post-crisis future. As noted by the NCQA, they cannot drive quality improvement “if their measures don’t take into account what has quickly become the fastest-growing modality for providing health care services.” For behavioral health providers who see telehealth as significant portion of outpatient services this is good news. It will also allow for more flexibility in designing programming to address VBR processes, especially when access to in person care is a major obstacle. https://www.ncqa.org/covid/

Payers are aware of the increase in utilization of telehealth and will build VBR programs around the assumption that provider are utilizing telehealth as part of their service array. Providers with fully integrated telehealth programming will be at a distinct advantage when it comes to VBR readiness in the post crisis era.

The use of telehealth is just one tool in a provider’s service array. Some COVID-19 other trends provide insight into post pandemic behavioral health utilization needs and potential cost drivers that may stimulate VBR development.

Systemic Impact of COVID-19

One interesting trend is the current underutilization of behavioral health services.  Many behavioral health providers have experienced significant decreases in utilization and revenue streams due to COVID-19, in large part due to increased unemployment from COVID-19 and the transition time of shifting benefits from private to public payer sources.

Juxtaposed against underutilization is the increase level of mental health conditions associated with the pandemic. It is expected that there will increase in levels of trauma, depression, and anxiety occurring as a result of the pandemic. The April 2020 Johns Hopkins COVID-19 Civic Life and Public Health Survey Wave 1 demonstrated a 10% increase in adults reporting serious psychological distress over 2019 reports. These results showed an exacerbation for adults with household income of less than $35,000 per year, 19% of whom reported serious psychological distress. There is also expected to be an increase in suicide rates. Unemployment is highly correlated with deaths by suicide, which has led experts to speculate that suicides will increase in 2020/2021. One model, based upon previous suicide and unemployment data, projects 3,235 to 8,164 additional deaths by suicide in the United States in 2020/20212

For payers and providers these trends will, at some point, create an increased demand for behavioral health services. Behavioral health providers with services that align to these needs, like expertise in areas of trauma informed care and crisis intervention programming, will be positioned to better serve these population health needs and meet the needs of payers who are looking for better outcomes for their consumers.

A second area of concern for all providers is the increase in opioid utilization. Due to increased opioid usage during COVID, mortality rates are expected to climb due opioid-related deaths. The American Medical Association (AMA) recently released a statement of concern about reports of increased levels of addiction and opioid-related mortality.

Value-based programs around addiction treatment have been on the rise since before COVID, both Cigna and Anthem have developed VBR programs that look at claims data in their private and public plan, tied that data consumer satisfaction surveys and outcomes. (See OPEN MINDS Addiction by the Numbers.) With the rise in opioid utilization it is reasonable to expect continued development of this treatment programming.

A Final Thought on Integrations

What is also interesting about VBR moving forward is the focus on screening, prevention, and integration of physical health care and behavioral health. Many states and national measures have incentivized screening for depression or substance abuse in primary care settings. And many plans are incentivizing referrals to co-located services and warm hand-offs where co-located services are not available. For forward-thinking behavioral health providers, the need for strong relationships with physical health care providers will present another opportunity for expanding their footprint and enhancing their revenue cycle through VBR arrangements. (See How VBR Prioritizes Primary Care as the Center of Integration.)

 

Learn more about Value Based Reimbursement with these resources from the VBCforBH.com Library.

  1. There Is No “Plan B” Alternative to Value Creating A Value-Focused Competitive Strategy in A Changing Market
  2. How to Develop Alternative Payment Models: A Guide to Building Effective Bundled Payment Models
  3. Care Delivery in A Value-Based Era – Evidence-Based, Practice-Based, Standardized & Measurement-Based
  4. Developing Case Rates? Better Find Your ‘Single Source of Truth’
  5. Adjust Your Strategic Sails!
  6. When the Competition Succeeds at Pay-For-Performance, What Will You Do?
  7. Options for Alternative Payment Models for Behavioral Health
  8. Using Your Performance Metrics to Build A Value Proposition for Health Plans

New Service Lines & New Revenue Streams: Building A Diversification Strategy & Conducting A Feasibility Analysis

Relying on a single payor or revenue stream is becoming a risky proposition. Now, more than ever, the ability to evaluate and modify current services and to develop new services to meet the challenges and opportunities in the market is an essential skill all executives need to master.

During this important session, led by OPEN MINDS Senior Associate Joe Naughton-Travers, attendees will review a process for evaluating service line performance and repurposing or launching new revenue streams.

Learning Objectives: 

  • Analyze current service lines and determine strategic options for diversification
  • Follow a structured approach to selecting new service lines for your organization and ensuring they are financially stable
  • Apply lessons learned from peer organizations who have launched or repurposed service lines

The OPEN MINDS Health Plan Partnership Summit: Working With Payers To Bend The Quality & Cost Curve

Executives of provider organizations must find a way to position themselves to work with health plans to deliver quality services and programs cost effectively. How? By working with the payers to align programs and services with their goals and providing the data that proves your service lines can achieve both high quality outcomes and lower costs.

This summit’s agenda will include informative case studies with experienced executives, thought leader discussions, and time for interactive dialogue with attendees.

9:00am – 10:00am Industry Perspective: Bending The Quality & Cost Curve

Keynote

10:00am – 10:15am Break

10:15am – 11:00am Diverting Consumers From Crisis, Reducing Repeat Admissions While Saving Money

Case Study

11:00am – 11:45am Specialty Care Coordination- Improving Outcomes & Enticing Payers

Case Study         

11:45am – 12:00pm Break

12:00pm – 12:45pm Joint Payer-Provider HEDIS Initiative Projects

Case Study

12:45pm – 1:00pm Break

1:00pm – 2:00pm How Payers Look At Big Data & What It Means For Providers

Keeping Clients & Staff Engaged During The Pandemic

This presentation was delivered on August 24, 2020 at The 2020 OPEN MINDS Management Best Practices Institute.

A recent survey by the National Council for Behavioral Health and Qualifacts found that organizations with legacy EHRs and little to no telehealth are having a more difficult time providing treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic. Get an overview of the survey findings and discuss how COVID-19 has changed or accelerated behavioral health providers’ needs for staff and client engagement tools such as appointment reminders, online documentation and billing and reporting requirements. See live presentations of client engagement tools (appointment reminders with telehealth link, myStrength, online documentation) and staff dashboards and interaction tools.

The New Role of Virtual Care in Behavioral Health

Recently Qualifacts and the National Council for Behavioral Health surveyed more than 1,000 behavioral health and human services providers about the role virtual care has played in their operations during the current COVID-19 crisis.

We also wanted to know how they were handling a remote workforce, how their revenues had been affected and how their technology solutions were holding up.

The results, unsurprisingly, showed rapid and significant structural changes in order to continue effective, efficient care to the communities served:

  • 80% said they delivering care virtually at least 60% of the time now
  • 70% said at least 40% of their care will be virtual going forward
  • 64% have experienced revenue losses — yet also report decreased no-show rates
  • 20% said they’d need a new EHR in order to support their new virtual programming

To dig into those details, and much more, download the whitepaper.